Images and the Mind

Figures of Speech…

Have you ever noticed how many “Figures of Speech” we use in daily conversation… not least the puns or the well-known “Freudian Slip”.


Tongue-tied / butterflies in the stomach / over a barrel / tied in knots / over the moon / learning curve / foot loose / spanner in the works / flooded with emotion / foot in mouth / head over heels / hands tied behind my back/ and many more….

 This absolutely fascinating phenomenon of how the mind will try to use pictures to describe deeper meanings to our experience and to guide us to hidden truths about our own lives is a golden opportunity. We mostly glance over these picturesque words and get on with the conversation’s main topic… work, weather, home-life…

 


What if…

You could find yourself in a safe and non-judgemental space where these word-pictures are invited to say more?...

In a therapy session I may notice that a particular figure of speech appears significant and ask you give yourself time to reflect and explore this further.

By doing so, you are giving your deeper self a chance for unhindered expression and get to the bottom of issues and “air them out”. If an issue has been hiding deeply because of the length of time it's been there or the amount of pain which has put it there, then careful work with the Arts may be the best way of getting a clear and safe look at things and find fresh perspectives on it.

Despite the, at times, playful nature people are often surprised how deeply effective this way of working can be.

 

Evocative or Provocative?

…images do their work

Publicity companies invest highly each year to evoke feelings through images. Aware of the power of the creative language they use it very effectively.

It can be used to manipulate or to express, and (different to verbal language) the creative arts can evoke or even provoke deep insight, which has been lost to awareness. Once this happens the same creative language can be used to process and heal difficult insights when they surface. As even Napoleon Bonaparte said “One picture speaks a thousand words” and thus the richness of images present a phenomenal opportunity.



Comments